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Georgia Southern Receives Grant to Study Prenatal and Early Childhood Biomass Smoke Exposure and Child Neurodevelopment

Dr. Joseph Telfair will serve as a Co-Investigator and Principal Evaluator to study biomass smoke exposure. Indoor air pollution from combustion of solid fuels for cooking has been identified as one of the ten most important risk factors in global burden of disease. This study will add to the body of knowledge on solid fuel use as a risk factor for birth outcome and infant neurodevelopment, and benefit from a well-established Indo-US collaboration among investigators with diverse and supplementary backgrounds while at the same time fostering technology transfer between the two partner institutions in Sri Lanka.

The current research is an expansion of an ongoing R21 study in Sri Lanka funded the National institutes of Environmental Health Sciences entitled “Prenatal Exposure to Solid Fuel Smoke and Birth Outcomes in Sri Lanka” (UAB IRB protocol number F100622014).  In the R21 study we have currently enrolled 719 pregnant mothers.  The study is now closed to enrollment.  Mothers were entered in their first three months of pregnancy and followed until delivery.  The healthy newborns are followed until 6 months of age.  We are conducting assessments of exposure to pollutants from solid fuel smoke (particulate matter less than 2.5µm (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO)) in each trimester of pregnancy and studying whether the exposure will have detrimental effects on infant brain development at birth and at 6 months.

Dr. Joseph Telfair currently serves as a Professor and Dual Chair at the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health Georgia Southern University and APHA President-Elect.

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Posted in Community Health, faculty-highlights, JPHCOPH, JPHCOPH